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#275481 - 05/18/17 02:27 PM Re: 50 Book Challenge 2017/What I've Read in 2017 [Re: Annie B.]
scifiJoan Offline
Top Banana

Registered: 11/15/10
Posts: 1191
Loc: out in the cornfields


Originally Posted By: Annie B.
Originally Posted By: groobie
I spent three hours this weekend reading "The Outsiders" by S.E. Hinton. My 8th grade son had to read it for his Language Arts class; he really liked it and wanted me to read it, too. It was fine, I suppose. I understand why he liked it - it was a very easy read with male characters. I thought it was simple, and that the plot developed in unrealistic ways. I looked up information on the book, and understand that it was written by a 16 year old, so the simplistic style makes sense, and I appreciate the "screw you" to the English teacher that gave her an F. I guess the best thing I can say about it is that it was good enough to make my son actually want to do his homework. smile

I have 10 copies of that book in the high school library I run, and I can never keep them on the shelf. The kids love that book.


I liked that book a lot too when I read it as a 7th grader.

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#275510 - 05/21/17 09:14 PM Re: 50 Book Challenge 2017/What I've Read in 2017 [Re: LabRat]
scifiJoan Offline
Top Banana

Registered: 11/15/10
Posts: 1191
Loc: out in the cornfields
#17 The Last One by Alexandra Oliva

A woman joins a reality/Survivor-like show. During the course of the competition, a pandemic occurs. It takes the woman, on a solo challenge, time to realize this.

I'm a big fan of apocalyptic books. This one was average.

Joan

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#275563 - 05/25/17 03:42 PM Re: 50 Book Challenge 2017/What I've Read in 2017 [Re: LabRat]
scifiJoan Offline
Top Banana

Registered: 11/15/10
Posts: 1191
Loc: out in the cornfields
#18 All is Not Forgotten by Wendy Walker

16 yr old Jenny Kramer is attacked and raped in the woods. She is given a controversial drug to 'erase' her memory of the attack. However, she is still having trouble processing what happened to her. Told from the view point of her psychiatrist, we see how these events affect Jenny, her family and their community.

It was a little challenging at times with this narrative technique to tell who was talking. Some interesting twists.

Joan

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#275666 - 06/04/17 12:47 PM Re: 50 Book Challenge 2017/What I've Read in 2017 [Re: LabRat]
scifiJoan Offline
Top Banana

Registered: 11/15/10
Posts: 1191
Loc: out in the cornfields
#19 Lost Girls by Caitlin Rother

True crime book about lost girls in San Diego. Good writing, just not a gripping story. It was obvious who had done the crimes and we didn't get much insight as to why, other than he was mentally ill.

#20 The Arrangement by Sarah Dunn

Tired from dealing with their special needs kid and jobs, Lucy and Owen decide to have an open marriage for six months.

Of course, their arrangement was destined to fail. Interesting book.

#21 Death Wave by Ben Bova

Jordan and Aditi return from New Earth to tell the occupants of Earth about the impending death wave. Second in the New Earth series.

I like Ben Bova but this book wasn't overly engaging.



Edited by scifiJoan (06/04/17 12:48 PM)

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#275667 - 06/04/17 05:17 PM Re: 50 Book Challenge 2017/What I've Read in 2017 [Re: LabRat]
scifiJoan Offline
Top Banana

Registered: 11/15/10
Posts: 1191
Loc: out in the cornfields
#22 Hillbilly Elegy by J. D. Vance

Quote:
From a former Marine and Yale Law School Graduate, a poignant account of growing up in a poor Appalachian town, that offers a broader, probing look at the struggles of America’s white working class.


Intriguing look at the struggles of a white working class family. I like that the author didn't feel that government programs will magically fix all of these problems.

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#275669 - 06/04/17 08:23 PM Re: 50 Book Challenge 2017/What I've Read in 2017 [Re: LabRat]
Annie B. Offline
Features Writer

Registered: 06/29/13
Posts: 991
Loc: California
16. She Persisted, by Chelsea Clinton

I bought this book for my nieces, ages 6 and 8, and then wound up reading it to them while they played. It's a picture book, aimed at grade levels K-3, which gives short biographies of 13 strong women in American history who wound up making great changes to the world, from Harriet Tubman to Sonia Sotomayor. I knew who most of them were, but there were a couple of women I had never heard of before.

Overall, this is a well-written book that introduces young readers to pieces of history that they may never have heard of before.
_________________________
"Oh, you can’t help that," said the Cat: "we’re all mad here. I’m mad. You’re mad."
"How do you know I’m mad?" said Alice.
"You must be," said the Cat, "or you wouldn’t have come here.”

- Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland

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#275701 - 06/07/17 09:27 AM Re: 50 Book Challenge 2017/What I've Read in 2017 [Re: LabRat]
scifiJoan Offline
Top Banana

Registered: 11/15/10
Posts: 1191
Loc: out in the cornfields
#23 Crosstalk by Connie Willis

Quote:
In the not-too-distant future, a simple outpatient procedure to increase empathy between romantic partners has become all the rage. And Briddey Flannigan is delighted when her boyfriend, Trent, suggests undergoing the operation prior to a marriage proposal - to enjoy better emotional connection and a perfect relationship with complete communication and understanding. But things don't quite work out as planned, and Briddey finds herself connected to someone else entirely - in a way far beyond what she signed up for.


A fun concept and engrossing read.


Edited by scifiJoan (06/07/17 09:28 AM)

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#275761 - 06/12/17 03:08 PM Re: 50 Book Challenge 2017/What I've Read in 2017 [Re: LabRat]
Annie B. Offline
Features Writer

Registered: 06/29/13
Posts: 991
Loc: California
17. Double Whammy, by Carl Hiaasen

Hiaasen satirizes the big business of bass fishing in Florida, as well as televised religion, and introduces his best-known character, the ex-governor turned hobo and wilderness defender Skink. A good read.
_________________________
"Oh, you can’t help that," said the Cat: "we’re all mad here. I’m mad. You’re mad."
"How do you know I’m mad?" said Alice.
"You must be," said the Cat, "or you wouldn’t have come here.”

- Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland

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#275770 - 06/13/17 09:08 AM Re: 50 Book Challenge 2017/What I've Read in 2017 [Re: LabRat]
scifiJoan Offline
Top Banana

Registered: 11/15/10
Posts: 1191
Loc: out in the cornfields
#24. Once We Were Sisters by Shelia Kohler

Shelia Kohler writes of her life, growing up in a wealthy family in South Africa and of her dear sister, who died young.

Shelia and her sister were in abusive marriages but since it was the 1950s, neither felt they could do much about it, even though their families were living on money from the wives.

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#275911 - 06/21/17 09:43 PM Re: 50 Book Challenge 2017/What I've Read in 2017 [Re: LabRat]
scifiJoan Offline
Top Banana

Registered: 11/15/10
Posts: 1191
Loc: out in the cornfields
#25 Winter Storm by Elin Hilderbrand

I don't have high expectations for a beach read about rich people in Nantucket. Many of her books are very entertaining. This one was lacking in many ways. I don't recommend it.

#26 The Collapse of Parenting: How We Hurt our Kids When We Treat them Like Grown-Ups by Leonard Sax

This family doctor with years of experience makes some excellent points about parenting issues.

#27 The Good Mother by A.L. Bird

I should've known a cheap Nook book promising to be a psychological thriller wouldn't be the greatest. A woman is kidnapped and relieved(?) to discover her daughter is being held in the room beside her. It only gets weirder.

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#275929 - 06/22/17 11:49 AM Re: 50 Book Challenge 2017/What I've Read in 2017 [Re: LabRat]
Annie B. Offline
Features Writer

Registered: 06/29/13
Posts: 991
Loc: California
18. The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest, by Stieg Larsson

In this third novel in the Millennium trilogy, Lisbeth Salander goes on trial for various charges, including attempting to murder her father. Meanwhile, Mikael Blomkvist looks for evidence that she is innocent, while the Section bugs apartments, steals evidence, commits murder, and does everything in its power to make the problem with Lisbeth Salander go away.

This was a good ending to the original Millennium trilogy (the books following this one were written by David Lagercrantz). There's a lot of stuff about Swedish law and politics, plus international plot points.

My boss recommended that I read this series. I was surprised to find that he was right about these being good books.
_________________________
"Oh, you can’t help that," said the Cat: "we’re all mad here. I’m mad. You’re mad."
"How do you know I’m mad?" said Alice.
"You must be," said the Cat, "or you wouldn’t have come here.”

- Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland

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#276070 - Yesterday at 02:59 PM Re: 50 Book Challenge 2017/What I've Read in 2017 [Re: LabRat]
Annie B. Offline
Features Writer

Registered: 06/29/13
Posts: 991
Loc: California
19. The Appeal, by John Grisham

In the town of Bowmore, Mississippi, a chemical manufacturing plant has dumped its waste products into the water supply, producing a deadly cancer cluster. A lawsuit against the company wins, but the appeal has to be taken to the Mississippi Supreme Court, on which judges are elected, rather than appointed.

Most of the book is about the whole election process, and it doesn't shy away from the ugly mess -- massive amounts of money spent and half-truths used to turn the voters against a sitting judge. Indeed, the novel went a long way toward explaining why it is that voters get so many e-mails begging for money for races they can't vote in (which I'd been wondering about, given the number of e-mails I've gotten asking for money for out-of-state congressional races).

Overall, I found this to be a decent read, although quite a number of reviewers have said it compared poorly with Grisham's earlier novels. (Since this is the first one I've read, I really can't say whether I would have liked the earlier ones better.)
_________________________
"Oh, you can’t help that," said the Cat: "we’re all mad here. I’m mad. You’re mad."
"How do you know I’m mad?" said Alice.
"You must be," said the Cat, "or you wouldn’t have come here.”

- Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland

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